Pregnant abroad? 7 great tips to help you cope

Life doesn’t stop when you’re pregnant – and you may indeed have great fun going abroad during the nine months. Indeed, most airlines will let you fly up until 36 weeks. But it can be a daunting thought, especially if it’s your first pregnancy. Ive got seven great tips to ensure you and your bump have a stress-free, enjoyable trip.

7 great tips to help you cope with being pregnant abroad

1. Take regular breaks

When you’re travelling, be it by car, train or plane, make sure you allocate sufficient time so you’re not having to rush. It will only cause you unnecessary stress. Plus, you’ll need plenty of toilet breaks and taking time to walk around is good for your blood circulation.

2. Pack all the essentials

When you’re pregnant, you’ll want to have essentials within easy reach – so pack your bag well and take a decent supply of what you think you’ll need. Pack more of what you won’t be able to easily get elsewhere and tailor it to your own requirements – for example, I’d definitely add some more snacks to the suggestions in this graphic.

7 great tips to help you cope with being pregnant abroad
Source: The Complete Guide to Travelling When Pregnant

I’d also suggest taking a good book as the perfect remedy to any hormone rollercoasters and to distract you from any dodgy tummy issues.

3. Choose your destination wisely

You’ll probably find it a lot easier to relax on holiday knowing there are good facilities nearby – shops for any last-minute purchases and good medical facilities, for example.

What’s more, when you’re pregnant, your limits change somewhat. Whereas on previous holidays, you might have explored cities all day and checked out the local nightlife later, you might want to take it down a notch. Create an itinerary of the must-sees and don’t be afraid to say you need extra breaks.

4. Expect some attention

If you’re in your second trimester and have an obvious baby bump, people are bound to come and chat to you. Particularly in Mediterranean countries, pregnant women will be the centre of attention – so don’t worry if they’re addressing your bump, not you.

It will also work in your favour as the bump is internationally recognised and can make it easier to express your condition – including receiving any extra help you might need.

5. Check in with your doctor

Before you set off, it’s a good idea to make sure your midwife is comfortable with you travelling. Also, as Parenting says, some airlines might require a note from your practitioner that states your due date, and that you have clearance to fly. Make sure you check beforehand.

6. Be cautious of food and water safety

As Gadling explains, pregnant women are more susceptible to food poisoning than the average person, as the immune system is suppressed so it doesn’t reject the fetus. So make sure you stick to bottled water and eat in restaurants where the food is freshly prepared. Check out reviews and opt for popular places.

7. Relax

Let’s face it, there won’t be a lot of time for relaxing when your baby arrives. So make the most of your trip and take the time to chill out. You deserve it.

 

Did you travel when you were pregnant? Share your top tips below.

4 thoughts on “Pregnant abroad? 7 great tips to help you cope

  1. Thanks! Love this

    Drinking plenty of water on the plane is a vicious circle at the best of times, ha.
    I would say choosing an aisle seat near the toilets is good advice for any trimester.

    It may be wise to eat before you get on the plane; plane food may not be pregnant friendly and isn’t appealing and filling at the best of times! Jen x

  2. Hey Seychelles Mama, Glad to read the brilliant tips about pregnancy abroad indeed!

    You’re such a great Mama. 🙂 Its kinda cool to read. 😉

    As a doctor I’m new mom and love to follow tips from you experts who have kids and old mom.

    Sounds great and not only 7 special tips but also professional sounds for the girls who wanna be pregnant and birth her child healthy. 🙂

    Thanks for brilliant suggestion. Keep it up!
    Lucy Mccullam recently posted…Symptoms, Causes & Risk factors of Uterine Fibroids: Diagnosis & Treatments for the Patients with FibroidsMy Profile

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